Tag Archives: Young-adult

Book review: The Rest of Us Just Live Here, by Patrick Ness.

I have been waiting for years to read this book, and having at last read it I can honestly say, it was well worth the wait.


 This is one of the best books I have read in a long time. The premise of it is absolutely inspired. Very original and very well executed.
Not only does the message resonate with me, and likely all other young-adult readers, but almost all of the smaller factors and themes do, too.

It reminded me a lot of Stephen Chbosky’s Perks of Being A Wallflower, in quite a few ways. Mostly through the characters, but also through the very essence of the book. In spite of this, the book itself was very unique.

Patrick Ness proves with this book that he is an innovative and beautiful writer, capable of turning the ordinary into the extraordinary.
He not only tackles many important issues relevant to modern society but also works through the smaller, day-to-day struggles of adolescence that almost everyone can relate to. And he does it so poetically.

Patrick’s writing is nothing short of astounding. It had me in stitches from laughter, it had me puzzled and curious, at times, it made me feel great empathy for the characters. Also, with the range of characters in the book, there is someone for almost everyone to relate to and or bond with.
His writing keeps to the story in a direct and economical way. His writing wasn’t overly flamboyant but was definitely not boring. It had a nice flow to it, and the story moved along at a good pace.
One thing I believed to be a flaw whilst reading the book was the predictability of it. However, what I thought I had solved, is actually pointed out toward the end of the book to have been known by everyone in the book bar the central protagonist. It was simply a classic case of the main character not noticing because he was too close to the puzzle to see the picture that was forming.
The writing is relatively simple, but not basic. I.e. it is easy to read but includes a lot of good literature. This works especially well, given the book’s target demographic.

Something else I enjoyed about this book is that, while it included romance, it did not overpower the story. It was also more romance being looked at, rather than romance happening.


As I have said, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would definitely recommend it. Specifically to young-adult readers, as is intended, but also to anyone who wants a secondhand view on the struggles of adolescence or wants something to relate to or something to help them.
Very hard to fault.

4.4/5.0

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Book Review: Queen of Shadows, by Sarah J. Maas.

Queen of Shadows is the fourth installment in Sarah J. Maas’s Throne of Glass series. It carries on the story of Aelin Ashryver Galathynius, once known as Celaena Sardothien, as she utilizes and faces her horrifying past in order to become the queen she was born to be.


After the disappointment of Heir of Fire, I was in no rush to read this book. It had been sitting on my windowsill since December until I decided, this week, to force myself to finish it. And I am glad I did.

The first half of the book seemed rather slow and played out, a lot of what was written seemed rather irrelevant and could have been left out. I would give specific examples if there were not so many to choose from.
The second half of the book, on the other hand, was very fast paced and kept to the storyline and point as much as possible. When I hit that switch in the book, I could not put it down.

As usual, Sarah’s writing is almost impossible to fault, being economical, well structured, and correct in all senses of the word. Her storytelling is another story. As I have said, a lot of what she writes is unnecessary. The stories and characters also seem rather unoriginal, a lot of the time, as I pointed out in my review on Throne of Glass.
On a more positive note, she does have a certain knack for creating strong bonds and emotions between her readers and her books. She did with me, at least. I found myself trapped in an unrelenting cycle of emotion whilst reading this. From excitement, to rage, to disgust, to sadness, to worry, the list goes on. I even cried, which only three books have ever been able to make me do.

Going back again to previous reviews for this series, I would like to make a note that, while most of the characters have stayed the same, the story, and a few characters, have finally shown some form of progression. It only took four books.
As for the characters who have not progressed, they have become increasingly more annoying. Aelin and Rowan’s romance still sickens me, as it completely stole a defining trait from Aelin’s personality and made her as cliché as any other protagonist with a love story.
It was interesting, however, to see Aelin finally have an emotion other than grief. It made reading about her a lot more palatable.

The book is predictable and only managed to surprise me a couple of time within its six hundred and forty-five pages. AND Sarah is still using those godforsaken ‘phantom’ metaphors and similes.
Although, Sarah has put reins on her character switching in this book. There is still plenty of it, however, it is used much more effectively and flows naturally with the storytelling.


Even with the lack of progression and the boring first half, the latter half was very strong and well written, and much more enjoyable. Needless to say, I recommend this to the same readership as the previous books in the series.

3.3/5.0

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