Tag Archives: Queen of Shadows

Book Review: Queen of Shadows, by Sarah J. Maas.

Queen of Shadows is the fourth installment in Sarah J. Maas’s Throne of Glass series. It carries on the story of Aelin Ashryver Galathynius, once known as Celaena Sardothien, as she utilizes and faces her horrifying past in order to become the queen she was born to be.


After the disappointment of Heir of Fire, I was in no rush to read this book. It had been sitting on my windowsill since December until I decided, this week, to force myself to finish it. And I am glad I did.

The first half of the book seemed rather slow and played out, a lot of what was written seemed rather irrelevant and could have been left out. I would give specific examples if there were not so many to choose from.
The second half of the book, on the other hand, was very fast paced and kept to the storyline and point as much as possible. When I hit that switch in the book, I could not put it down.

As usual, Sarah’s writing is almost impossible to fault, being economical, well structured, and correct in all senses of the word. Her storytelling is another story. As I have said, a lot of what she writes is unnecessary. The stories and characters also seem rather unoriginal, a lot of the time, as I pointed out in my review on Throne of Glass.
On a more positive note, she does have a certain knack for creating strong bonds and emotions between her readers and her books. She did with me, at least. I found myself trapped in an unrelenting cycle of emotion whilst reading this. From excitement, to rage, to disgust, to sadness, to worry, the list goes on. I even cried, which only three books have ever been able to make me do.

Going back again to previous reviews for this series, I would like to make a note that, while most of the characters have stayed the same, the story, and a few characters, have finally shown some form of progression. It only took four books.
As for the characters who have not progressed, they have become increasingly more annoying. Aelin and Rowan’s romance still sickens me, as it completely stole a defining trait from Aelin’s personality and made her as cliché as any other protagonist with a love story.
It was interesting, however, to see Aelin finally have an emotion other than grief. It made reading about her a lot more palatable.

The book is predictable and only managed to surprise me a couple of time within its six hundred and forty-five pages. AND Sarah is still using those godforsaken ‘phantom’ metaphors and similes.
Although, Sarah has put reins on her character switching in this book. There is still plenty of it, however, it is used much more effectively and flows naturally with the storytelling.


Even with the lack of progression and the boring first half, the latter half was very strong and well written, and much more enjoyable. Needless to say, I recommend this to the same readership as the previous books in the series.

3.3/5.0

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